TEACHING DELIVERED THROUGH
FRANCES MARIE KLUG
ON JULY 6, 1981

"ADMIT THE TRUTH"

JULY 6, 1981

“ADMIT THE TRUTH”

“A daily examination of conscience is limited in a truly conscientious look at our offenses against God.

Most times one’s bad habits that are offensive are overlooked by one’s conscience, because one’s daily habits are taken for granted as normal acts, normal thoughts, normal words or normal deeds connected to one’s nature, personality, environment, and dealings with other people.

One’s examination of conscience is more apt to cover only the things that occurred, leaving an indelible impression that they are out of the realm of an ordinary, natural or acceptable way of living.  So as we take another look at our conscience when we examine our actions, we must look at ourselves in a realistic course of daily living in our daily search to become a Saint.

Our slightest faults that are irritating to others must be worked on to overcome them.  Our slightest impure thoughts or actions must be seen by us as a necessary thing to change for the good of our Soul.  We must question ourselves about our language imperfections, our intentions in why we do things, and when we perform an act of charity, is it pure charity or false charity?

In examining our conscience we should evaluate our part of all we took part in that day, for in just examining one’s conscience we could easily eliminate what displeased others and only think about what displeased us, thus justify any unkind or undue retaliation from us to someone else, or any unkind act we made in someone else’s direction.

Let’s look at our faults that are offensive first to God, and to our fellowman.  Let’s recognize these faults as irritating to others, misleading to others, poor example to others, or even using others for the benefit of selfish motives for ourselves.

We must always remember that an examination of our personal habits, intentions we take for granted, our language that has become a natural course of speech, our modesty that we abuse by accepting immodesty as our code of behavior, and/or our indiscreet manners that we accept as personal and above reproach, supersedes an examination of conscience when we sincerely want to act in a more pure state of being for the good of our Soul.”

prevnext
Printable PDF version