TEACHING DELIVERED THROUGH
FRANCES MARIE KLUG
ON JANUARY 25, 1983

"ARE YOU A HUMAN DERELICT? ARE YOU A RELIGIOUS DERELICT?"

JANUARY 25, 1983

“ARE YOU A HUMAN DERELICT?
ARE YOU A RELIGIOUS DERELICT?”

“All derelicts do not live on skid row or in the ghetto.  It’s a word that is seldom used in regard to people who are considered middle class or upper class in their living habits.

There are many people who are derelict in several areas of their responsibilities.  They fail miserably and are full of self-pity.  These people would never consider themselves a derelict on society.

A good examination of one’s responsibilities and how one acts in fulfilling these responsibilities could be the beginning of a new look at life, a step forward in a successful manner, and also bring out the best in you rather than the restlessness that a lack of self-confidence permits.

Do I make excuses before I think of solutions?

Do I patronize others so they will recognize me as important?

Do I place importance in the wrong places?

Do I falsify my monetary measures and live above my means?

Do I dress like a bum so others will not borrow money from me?

Do I put on the poor mouth or am I a braggadocio?

As far as my religion is concerned, do I fail in my responsibilities?

Am I a fence sitter when I say I believe one way and then never fulfill my obligations as a Roman Catholic should?

A look in the mirror never shows what’s in a man’s mind, his intentions, his imagination, or how he truly handles his responsibilities.  Derelicts come in all styles, all ages, all temperaments, all classes, all vocations, all social places.

To be a derelict does not always mean you are destitute in reference to no food, no clothing, no home, or are abandoned, forsaken or deserted.  It might just mean that you are too lazy to do what’s right to conquer your failings and weaknesses, and to stand up and be counted for your true value of worth as a responsible human being, accepting the challenges of life along with the obstacles, doing this in dignity and not self-pity or self-destruction, doing this in a way of participation, in good example to everyone, and giving strength morally, physically and spiritually when and where it is needed.”

“Giving moral, physical, mental or Spiritual strength to others affords and supports much of such strength to one’s self.”

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